Anyone Using a Space Heater in Baby's Room? - BabyCenter

If so, what brand/type? Do you recommend it? Is it safe?We try to keep our house warm (around 74-76 degrees), however, baby's room is always the coolest (3 windows in a very small room). At night the temp in his room drops to 70 degrees or below. I know some people say it's good for the baby but I don't like it... his hands are so cold when I get him to feed him... plus I freeze when I sit in his room at night to nurse him. So I was thinking about getting a space heater for his room. Any recommendations will be greatly appreciated!

HOT PRODUCTS
GET IN TOUCH WITH US
Artículos recomendados
Fire Causes $75,000 Damage to Cambridge Townhouse ...
CAMBRIDGE - A fire in a Cambridge townhouse Wednesday morning is suspected to have occurred because of an extension cord and a covered space heater, says the Cambridge fire platoon chief.Three adults in the rental unit on Elgin Street North were unhurt in the 7:22 a.m. fire. The fire was contained to a second-floor bedroom. Damage is estimated at about $75,000.Platoon Chief Martin Mills said the person living in the rental unit was using hydro from another unit across the laneway at the Max Saltsman Co-operative Housing Inc. complex.The extension cord could be seen going from the bedroom window to the other unit, about 30 metres away. It is believed that the hydro had been cut off from the unit where the fire occurred for about a month. Mills said the extension cord in the upper floor bedroom was covered in tape and the space heater was covered with clothes."We know the origin was in the bedroom," he said.Mills said the space heater was buried under clothing and furniture."This time of the year, everyone is using extension cords and people tuck them under the carpet but they release heat," he said. "If using extension cords keep the clear and away from combustibles."Also, extension cords are meant to be used temporarily, he added.The extensions cords, covered in painter's tape, could be seen on the front lawn.Fire prevention officer Eric Robinson said that when fire crews arrived on the scene they hit the extension cord that was hanging from tree limbs as it went from one unit to the other.Robinson said it was unclear how many people lived in the rental unit. Firefighters were able to quickly contain the fire to the bedroom within 10 minutes but there was smoke damage to the rest of the unit.Neighbouring units were not damaged.Mike Watson, a friend of the woman who lived in the unit, said he was walking by the complex just after 7 a.m. People were yelling fire and he went in to help.He tried to grab a garden hose but it was frozen."I was filling up buckets of water from the kitchen and taking it upstairs," he said."It was hard to see. It was really smoky. We were choking," said Watson, who had black soot on his face from the fire.Grand River Transit arrived to keep residents warm while they were temporarily evacuated from their units. The woman from the unit where the fire occurred is being assisted by Canadian Red Cross.Mills said the woman will not be able to return to the unit because of the damage.Twitter: @MonteiroRecord
2021 07 23
leer más
Don't Let a Power Outage Leave You in the Dark - LA Times
The approach of winter means the prime season for power failures. Storms can down power lines and darken entire neighborhoods. The use of electric blankets and space heaters puts an added strain on home electrical systems.By preparing for the possibility of a power outage, you'll lessen chances that you'll be left in the dark. Most of these suggestions also apply year-round.How to prepare for an outage:Keep several flashlights on hand and test them now and then. A good choice is the rechargeable type that plugs into the wall and is always ready.Learn about your home's electrical system. Know whether the electricity coming into your house travels through a fuse box or a circuit breaker panel. If you have a fuse box, keep fuses handy and store them near the fuse box.Familiarize yourself with the heating system. Some gas-fired furnaces can be operated manually. Before the heating season begins, have your gas company show you how.If the power fails:Turn off and disconnect all appliances and fixtures. Leave a lamp turned on so you can tell when service is restored.Keep lighted candles away from drafts and children.Don't tie up the telephone lines with unnecessary calls.Open the refrigerator as seldom as possible. Food will stay frozen for up to 48 hours in a fully loaded freezer that is kept closed; for 24 hours in a half loaded freezer.If you see downed power lines, don't go near them; they are deadly. Let power company crews--specially trained to handle such dangerous situations--do the job.An overloaded electrical system can cause a fuse to blow or a circuit breaker to trip. The result will be loss of power in a room--or sometimes in an entire house. Most often, the problem is caused by running too many appliances on the same circuit--like a broiler, an iron and a space heater all plugged into the same outlet.Here's how to replace a blown fuse or reset a breaker:When replacing a fuse, first shut off the main power supply by shifting the handle on the side of the box to the "off" position. Or pull out the boxes holding the main cartridge fuses. While working at the fuse box, always be sure you are standing on dry ground and keep one hand at your side or in your pocket to avoid accidentally touching a metal object with it and completing a ground.Remove the blown fuse by turning it counterclockwise, just like unscrewing a light bulb.If the fuse is a cartridge type, pull the plastic box holding the fuses straight out. Then pull the fuse out of the box. Large cartridge-type fuses should be removed with a fuse puller.Replace the blown fuse with one of the same type and capacity. A 15-ampere fuse should only be replaced with another 15-ampere fuse. It is extremely important not to replace a blown fuse with one of a higher capacity.Your final step should be to turn the main power back on, bringing power back to the whole house.To reset a circuit breaker, press down on the "off" side to reset it. Then push it back to the "on" position.If you regularly blow fuses or trip breakers because you're running too many appliances on the same circuit, you may want to upgrade the wiring on that circuit. This job is best left to a licensed electrician.
2021 07 23
leer más
Portable Heaters for the Home - Five Important Tips for Buying a Heater That You Must Know
If you are looking to buy portable heaters for the home, I am quite sure that you might be having a difficult time to choose one that meet your personal needs. In this article, I will help you by giving 5 tips for buying a heater. Actually, choosing a space heater is a matter of going through the wide varieties of heaters in the market. There are many types of made and models, power ratings, and fuel sources to consider that it can take some time to get the right one. Now I am going to break it down a little to make your life easier.Knowing the different kinds of space heaters.Radiant heaters: Work by emitting infrared radiation that directly heat up the objects in front of the heaters (rather than the surrounding air). If you only require heat for your work station or in a small section of a room, a radiant heater will be ideal for you as it is quiet and will use very minimal power.Forced-air heaters: Work by using a fan to blow warm air which has been heated by metal or ceramic heating elements. Forced-air heater is ideal for quick heating for a small- to medium-sized room, however it can be quite noisy.Convection heaters: This type of heater will use cold air from the floor and get it heated by heating coils. The warm air will then be emitted from the top of the heater. A convection heater is ideal for quickly heating up a small- to medium-sized room, however it can make some noise too.Radiators: Work by heating oil that are filled in a reservoir, slowly heating the surrounding air. If you don't mind the heating speed, you might want to choose this type of heaters. Radiators very quiet and best for bedrooms.Electric or a combustion model - Which one should I purchase?Ask yourself whether or not you want a heater that are useful in emergencies, or one that will heat areas larger than a single room. If you require a heater for that kind of situations, buy a "combustion" model. Choose one that is powered by a fuel or gas like propane, kerosene, natural gas, or diesel. You can choose any type of fuel based on convenience and local availability. For instance, diesel would be ideal for a heater that you often take for long car trips.How powerful must the heater be?Heaters are measured by British Thermal Unit or BTU. (the amount needed to heat one pound of water by 1 degree F). In order to know how many BTU you require:Calculate the volume of the area to be heated by multiplying square footage by height.Multiply that number by 4 if you have poor insulation, 3 if the insulation is average, or 2 if it's good.The resulting number is a benchmark for how many BTU you'll need.How much will it cost me to run space heaters?Generally, electric heaters cost more to use than combustion heaters. You need a thermostat feature to ensure energy efficiency. This is a must-have for any heater. For radiant heaters, models with a 360 degree heating surface can heat bigger areas. If you want a forced-air heater, models with ceramic elements are known to be more energy efficient.Are space heaters a safe for my home?Space heaters have been identified as the cause for about 25,000 residential fires each year. To be sure that you are safe when using them, always abide to the manufacturer's usage instructions. Fill up the warranty card so that you can receive informational updates from the manufacturer. Be sure to buy space heaters that have extra safety features such as an automatic shut-off switch that can shut down the unit if, it gets tipped over accidentally. On top of that, pick a model where the heating element is properly enclosed within the unit.
2021 07 17
leer más
Fire Safety Checklist: Preventing Fires in Your Home Office
You have achieved the ultimate dream: working from home. Your office space is set up, you have all the needed supplies and you're ready to get to work. But wait just a minute-is your office actually safe?Unlike a large office building, you don't have an Occupational Health and Safety Department to analyze your office space, ensuring that all safety procedures are implemented. The safety of your office-and your home-is completely in your own hands.Corporations have safety measures in place for a reason; there are numerous workplace hazards that can put lives and valuable information at peril, fire being one of them. And unlike an office building, you probably don't have the extra safety precautions in place, like sprinkler systems and exit signs.I know you have lots of important work to do, and deadlines are looming, but let's take a moment to act like our own health and safety department by going over this home office fire safety checklist.1. Be aware of electrical hazards.Electronics and cords are enemy No. 1 of fire safety, and a modern office is full of them. Loose or frayed wires, faulty electronics and overloaded plugs are all common fire hazards that often go unchecked.Ensure all your electrical cords and plugs are in good condition, and toss anything that looks loose, worn or frayed.Do not use an extension cord to service more than one appliance at a time. Extension cords are meant to act as temporary measures and are not to be used for long periods of time for any device.Use power strips for light loads such as computers, printers and cell phones, but be sure to unplug the strip or flip the switch to off when not in use.Buy a strip that has an internal circuit breaker to prevent overloading and overheating.Never run cords under rugs or carpets.Ensure light bulbs do not exceed the recommended light fixture wattage.If you must use a space heater in your office, then use a radiator-type heater with a tip-over switch (not a coil space heater), and keep them clear from all papers, curtains, clothing, chairs and rugs.(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push();2. Organize and store your papers properly.Do you have piles of paper everywhere? This clutter may be more dangerous than you think.Keep all those valuable documents safe by replacing paper or cardboard file boxes with metal or fireproof ones.Clean up all office clutter and store all papers away from heaters, light fixtures and other heat-generating appliances such as copiers and coffee makers.Create an organized desk space that contains the bare working necessities.Allow for air space around all sides of heat-generating appliances such as computers, copiers, printers and chargers.3. Check out your chargers.It seems our phones and computers are always charging, but how safe are phone and computer chargers and what are some common fire hazards we are risking every day by using them improperly?Don't charge your phone or computer overnight or for long periods of time unattended.Create a charging station that is safely away from all combustibles such as wood, paper and cardboard.Do not leave phones and computers unattended near or on flammable materials such as beds, couches, curtains and pillows.Always use the authentic cables and chargers that came with the devices. Do not purchase cheaper, non-brand cables and chargers as they are not always built with the correct wattage or amp rating that your device requires.Always buy directly from the manufacturer and beware of cheap counterfeits as they are not always built with safety in mind.4. Follow a yearly office safety maintenance plan.Prevention is paramount when it comes to fire safety. When you are your own boss, you're also taking on every office role-including the role of the health and safety department, so be sure to conduct yearly office inspections.Install a smoke detector in your office space. It's best if all your home detectors are interconnected so if one goes off, they all go off. Update the batteries yearly and test it monthly.Buy a fire extinguisher for your home office and perform monthly maintenance inspections on it.Create an office safety checklist that covers all aspects of office safety, allowing you to easily remember what needs to be inspected.Have a fire exit strategy in place and practice it often.Running your own home office comes with a lot of responsibilities, but your biggest job is to protect the safety of your home, loved ones and belongings. By following these simple fire prevention tips, you can get back to enjoying the satisfaction that comes with working from home.amzn_assoc_placement = "adunit0";amzn_assoc_enable_interest_ads = "true";amzn_assoc_tracking_id = "powerhomebizguid";amzn_assoc_ad_mode = "auto";amzn_assoc_ad_type = "smart";amzn_assoc_marketplace = "amazon";amzn_assoc_region = "US";amzn_assoc_textlinks = "";amzn_assoc_linkid = "45a2327acccb8a67913d4c186adefb04";amzn_assoc_emphasize_categories = "1000,133140011";amzn_assoc_fallback_mode = "type":"search","value":"Office Fire Safety";amzn_assoc_default_category = "Books"; 10 Common Home Office MistakesHow to Make Your Home Office as Safe as PossibleHiding the Tangle of Cords On Your Desk: 3 Containment StrategiesHow to Use Natural Light To Your Advantage in Your Home OfficeHow to Protect Your Home Office from Disasters
2021 07 15
leer más
Curtains, Rugs, High-tech Bulbs and Other Fall Tips for a Cozy and Cost-efficient Home
As temperatures drop and daylight is in shorter supply, we fight back: We crank up the heat in our homes and turn on lights earlier and earlier. And yet we also want to keep our heating and electric bills as low as we can.Can you keep your home warm and inviting all winter while still conserving energyHere, three home design experts offer advice on how to keep things cozy while minimizing energy use this winter. Their suggestions range from the traditional (there's a reason why your grandmother hung those heavy curtains in winter) to the high-tech, including a thermostat that can talk to your iPad.TRY NEW TECHMaxwell Ryan, founder of the popular home décor website ApartmentTherapy.com, is a designer. John Colaneri, co-host of HGTV's "Kitchen Cousins," is a construction expert who builds and remodels homes.Both offer identical pieces of advice about staying warm while conserving power and saving money: Swap out your old incandescent bulbs (and those swirly compact fluorescent bulbs, too) for the new Cree brand LED bulbs."They can last longer than 10 years and they use 84 per cent less energy than incandescents," Ryan says. "They also are dimmable" and give a warm-looking light - a big change from the energy-saving compact fluorescents."If you do the math on the LED," he says, the bulbs save you so much on electricity that they pay for themselves within a year and then last about nine more years.Colaneri and Ryan also both advise homeowners to replace old thermostats with new Nest brand models. "They take 30 per cent off your bill each month," Colaneri says. "And they look very high-tech and cool to display."Nests are programmable "learning thermostats," which means they track your habits and adjust accordingly. They also connect via Wi-Fi to check weather reports online, and you can control them remotely from an iPad.There is new outdoor technology, as well. On your deck or patio, designer Brian Patrick Flynn suggests adding a new propane-powered space heater. The newest models are cost-effective and stylish, says Flynn, executive producer of HGTV.com's Holiday House."They look like modern sculpture," says Flynn, "and many of them are under $500. To ensure my outdoor spaces stay warm during the winter, I keep modern, 7-foot tall space heaters in my covered outdoor living room. They're on wheels, so it's easy to move them around to wherever people are seated. And once lit, the glass tubes which contain the flame from the propane tank put on a gorgeous show."EMBRACE UPHOLSTERYWarm, cozy upholstery fabrics work on a practical level by holding your warmth when you touch or sit on them. But Ryan points out that they also work visually: A room full of soft, warm fabrics will give you a psychological sense of warmth that adds to your enjoyment.So add thick throw blankets to chairs and sofas, and swap out silk-covered pillows and even lampshades for ones covered in thicker, nubbier fabrics like muslin and burlap.Ryan also recommends using thick curtains in winter. A decade ago, he says, "curtains were considered fusty and old-fashioned and expensive." But with so many beautiful, inexpensive curtains available today, they've become popular again.Besides adding colour or a bold pattern to a room, curtains also block cold air that might leak in around windows. And they muffle sound from outside, which Ryan says helps make rooms feel more insulated in winter."Curtains," he says, "aren't just for your grandparents anymore."The same technique can help warm up outdoor spaces. Flynn recommends Sunbrella's outdoor velveteen fabric for chairs and sofas. He also likes thick, woven blends."Velveteen is amazing for the outdoors," he says, "since it's warm and fuzzy."LIGHT THE FIRECrackling flames in an indoor fireplace can change the feel of a room instantly. And outdoors, they bring a welcome infusion of heat and light on a winter evening."Outdoor fireplaces are increasingly more and more popular, coast to coast," Flynn says. "They're not all that much of an expense like an outdoor kitchen would be."If you're building a new outdoor fireplace, leave ample room for seating. "Many times homeowners have outdoor fireplaces built, but there's only enough room for a small table or two chairs. What's the point, people The whole idea is to gather and stay cozy outdoors," Flynn says.He suggests planning "at least 12-by-14 feet of space around the front of the fireplace to ensure a sofa and loveseat as well as a coffee table and end tables will fit."LAY DOWN RUGSGleaming hardwood or tile floors are lovely in spring and summer. But in cold weather, add a thick rug or swap out a thin one for something heavier. This will not only warm your feet, but also change the look and sound of your space."When acoustics are dampened," Ryan says, "the room feels warmer."An outdoor rug can have the same impact. "Thick outdoor area rugs are made of acrylic/wool blends," Flynn says. "The wool feels great on your feet and definitely locks in warmth."IMPROVE YOUR CIRCULATIONThis last tip, shared by Maxwell Ryan, comes from a conversation he had years ago with home décor guru Martha Stewart. She advised him to run his ceiling fans backward in winter to push warm air back down along the walls of the room.If you don't have ceiling fans, Ryan suggests adding one or two for energy savings and added comfort year-round.
2021 07 12
leer más
The 5 Best Selling Electric Space Heaters
Managing a household budget during a down economy can be a daunting task. One budget item that everyone pays close attention to during the cold winter months is heating fuel costs.What many home owners have discovered over the years is that zoned heating is an immediate and effective method to keep a lid on high heating bills. Zoned heating is accomplished by turning back the main thermostat 5-10 degrees and heating only the room(s) that are occupied.More often than not, the favored heating appliance for room by room zone heating is the portable electric space heater.What follows is a list of the 5 best selling electric space heaters determined by sales figures compiled from Amazon.com.#5 - Although technically a space heater, the Dimplex CS3311 is best known as the number 1 selling electric stove in the US.The Dimplex stove appeals to buyers who want something more decorative than the average space heater but doesn't require a lot of space. This makes them ideal for apartments, condos, and RV's.#4 - Honeywell HZ-2200 Mini Tower Surround Heater The Honeywell Mini Tower is an inexpensive, compact heater that features optional front or surround heat, adjustable thermostat, and back-up thermal circuit breaker.It is also plagued by complaints of excessive noise, thermostat control failure, and a short working life.#3 - DeLonghi EW7707CM Oil-filled Radiator This radiant heater is the only type of space heater allowed in college dorms. Since it's a pure radiant heater it has no fan and is ultra quiet.Although the product description states it has a low surface temperature, you might be better off with the model TRD0715T if you have kids or pets to worry about. The difference is the TRD0715T incorporates several vertical thermal tunnels which keep the hot elements enclosed and out of reach.#2 - Lasko 755320 Ceramic Tower Heater Ceramic heaters have really gained in popularity over the last few years. Ceramic elements provide instant heat and the heater itself is generally quieter than other fan equipped heaters.The tower configuration provides more heat higher up and the oscillating (side to side) motion distributes the heat evenly throughout the room.#1 - Lasko 754200 Ceramic Heater The Lasko 754200 is currently #4 on Amazon's site wide Best Sellers List and has been there for 322 days.Although compact in size and only 10" tall, it has the same 1,500 watt heat output as larger units. The fact that it's priced around $20 probably contributes a great deal to its popularity, but it would be difficult to remain a best seller for as long as it has if it wasn't a good value.
2021 07 11
leer más
Sweet Potatoes Are Grown From Cuttings
Dear Helen: My husband and I eat sweet potatoes regularly and we're interested in growing them this year. Could you give us some hints on cultivating these plants? Is there a particular seed potato that you recommend? I've not noticed "eyes," that is sprouting points, on the tubers I buy. N.M. Dear N.M.: Sweet potatoes are grown not from seed tubers but from rooted cuttings, which are becoming more commonly available as increasing numbers of gardeners become keen to grow their own. Once you have the plants in the garden, cuttings taken at harvest time will keep you supplied with material for freshly rooted spring cuttings to plant outdoors. In the past, my source of cuttings has been Mapple Farm (mapplefarm.com). They were sold out of cuttings by March last year. Several readers told me they secured cuttings from Bella's Bees, Berries and Farm Fresh Produce in Brentwood Bay, or from Brian Minter (1-800-661-3919). The primary requirement of a sweet potato planting is heat. Choose the sunniest, warmest spot possible. Raised beds with a light-textured, slightly acidic soil are ideal. Heavy fertilizing is not necessary. A little bone meal for phosphorus and kelp meal for potassium are all you need. An abundance of nitrogen in the soil stimulates vine growth at the expense of tuber development and tends to cause spindly tubers as well. Pre-heating the soil with plastic for two to three weeks prior to planting is helpful. Clear plastic promotes soil warming to greater depths than black, while black plastic blocks weed growth. Take your pick. Arranging a cover of ventilated clear plastic or a floating row fabric cover over the planting will further concentrate heat around the planting. I plan to try a few plants also in large pots this year, to see how that works. The soil needs to be warmed to at least 13 C before planting through 23-centimetre holes cut in the plastic about 45 cm apart. Water regularly in hot, dry weather. Drawing down and anchoring the edges of plastic with soil at each hole will direct water to the plant roots. I dig the plants when the soil temperature dips to 10C, and cure the harvested tubers for 10 to 14 days in humid heat (27 C). These conditions for curing can be improvised in different ways, but I usually place the tubers in a slatted basket of some kind and set it near the wood stove with damp towels arranged around the rim and a piece of plastic placed loosely over top. I've also used a space heater as a source of warmth during the curing. Once cured, sweet potatoes are stored in a cool place, about 18 C. Cold storage will damage them. I keep mine in baskets just inside the north-facing front doorway, where it stays decidedly cool in fall, winter and early spring. Georgia Jet, an orange-fleshed sweet potato, is the best variety, but others are available for the adventurous. Dear Helen: Large poplar and Leyland cypress trees grow near my vegetable garden, which has become invaded by their roots. I was thinking of building contained beds and wonder what to put on the bottom to keep the roots out. L.K. Dear L.K.: Both these trees are fast-growing and invasive, and incompatible with nearby vegetable-growing areas. Personally, I'd either move the vegetable garden or remove the trees if you are able. You can build raised beds and line them with landscape fabric, but from what I've seen and from what friends have experienced, they are not always wholly successful in the long term as the soil in them lacks the totally free interaction with the subsoil. And you'd have to build fairly deep beds to successfully grow anything apart from the most shallow-rooted vegetables. The project may be worth the effort, however, if there is no other place for a food garden and, for whatever reason, you must stick with the trees.
2021 07 11
leer más
Controlling the Costs of Baseboard Heating
There some fine reasons for using electric baseboard heating, but it really the most expensive kind of heating there is. You will want to consider some cost saving measures if you have to rely on this type of heat. Electric baseboard heating mainly works on the principle of convection, instead of radiation. Radiation is that warm glow you feel. Convection is when the surrounding air is warmed and then naturally moves elsewhere. Cooler air replaces it and a cycle is generated. You can increase efficiency by placing a small fan near the unit to speed the process. The benefits of this type of heating are that you can control your heating in zones. If there are rooms that do not need constant heat, you can simply shut off the units in that room. You may also find that baseboard heating does not dry out the air as quickly as forced air heating. The quickest way to save money is to keep the baseboard heat shut off in rooms that you seldom use, and then have a space heater for when you need heat. A fan driven space heater will economically keep you warm in a sewing room, for example, where you only spend a couple of hours a few days a week. The fan will warm you effectively and quickly. The second way to save money is to make sure your heater is set up efficiently. Air flow around the heater is a must, so check and see if there is anything limiting the air flow. Is thick carpet underneath your unit? Is your unit clean? Are drapes or furniture blocking the air flow? Eliminate or reduce these obstructions and your baseboard units will work far more efficiently. Next you will want to assess your insulation. There are some tricks to improving your insulation without much cost. Quilted wall hangings can insulate your walls. Check behind the face places of your outlets and switches. You can put a cheap foam gasket in there to slow heat loss. If your decor is not paramount, you can add plastic over drafty windows. Ideally, you would want real insulation in the ceilings, walls and floors. In the ceilings aim for at least enough for an R38 rating. The floors should have R30 and the walls, around R20. Windows too, get rated. They go by U-Factor, which should not be above .35, where a higher number is worse - contrary to other insulation, where a higher number is better. It is important that for any room that you use daily, do not turn the heat off completely. It is more expensive to completely heat a room back up every day. Keep it at a reduced, but warmer than unheated, temperature, instead. If the cost of electric baseboard heating is getting to be too much, you can expect to pay $4,000 to $6,000 to have a whole ducted forced air furnace system put in. Make sure you hire a quality contractor, because when they start cutting things away under your house or in your attic , incompetent installers can cause structural damage to your home. Be smart with the use of your electric baseboard heating and you will be able to keep warm and control the costs. A few efficiencies here and there will make a big difference in your utility bill and you will get to enjoy the feeling of beating the electric company who loves to see your meter spin.
2021 07 10
leer más
The Warriors' Room Where It Happens
OAKLAND, Calif. - The video room at the Golden State Warriors' practice facility has the general dimensions and, for much of the season, the atmospheric conditions of an industrial-size freezer. There is enough space for a couple of desks, some computer monitors, an assortment of sneakers and an exposed bundle of cables that must be some sort of fire hazard.For a team with several future Hall of Famers and a running collection of N.B.A. championships, Golden State has made the room decidedly no-frills. Its appearance also camouflages its importance. The Warriors, like many teams, devour game film. Coaches dissect clips of opponents with forensic detail. Players study possessions every day.The job of editing and organizing all that footage belongs to James Laughlin, the team's 29-year-old video coordinator, and two 26-year-old colleagues: Jacob Rubin, a basketball operations assistant, and Nick Kerr, the assistant video coordinator and Coach Steve Kerr's son. They spend months on their computers swimming through a sea of back cuts and outlet passes, downloading the clips onto hard drives and shipping them off to their superiors for closer examination."The main thing we want to do is make every coach's life as easy as possible," Laughlin said, "especially Steve's life."At the same time, the video room itself - complete with its portable space heater and "Log Like a Champion Today" poster that hangs at an odd angle - has operated for years as an unsung nerve center for the Warriors, who trail the Toronto Raptors by two games to one in the N.B.A. finals. Game 4 is Friday night.The hallway outside the room gets a lot of foot traffic, so players are always crashing the video staff members' pad and staying a while. And there are the coaches, who meet in the room because the setting is so relaxed: neutral ground. The video staff members are in the middle of it all."These guys know more than anyone else," said the assistant coach Bruce Fraser, who made an impromptu appearance in the video room after a recent practice. "And I'm not saying basketball-wise - they're learning - but they know more about everything to do with our team, because everyone comes in here. It's almost like a barber shop."Sure enough, Fraser was soon followed by a motley cast of characters, including his fellow assistants Jarron Collins (who said the room was "where the magic happens"), Willie Green (who described the video staff members as "essential" to the team as he ate his lunch) and Chris DeMarco (who once worked in the video room but suggested that Laughlin and his two colleagues were better at the job)."They're the best we've had," DeMarco said.Jonnie West, the director of basketball operations, was soon standing in the doorway, even though Rubin is his roommate and they see each other all the time. Jonas Jerebko, the reserve forward, also made a cameo. Jerebko is one of the coordinators' favorite visitors: He brings them Swedish hair products and energy drinks."The guys are always coming by to say, 'Hi,'" Laughlin said. "It makes us feel like we're really part of it."The point is: The Warriors have created a culture where all contributions are valued, and Steve Kerr will listen to anyone. During the 2015 N.B.A. finals, he famously adopted the small-ball Death Lineup at the suggestion of Nick U'Ren, then a low-level special assistant who has since been promoted to director of basketball operations alongside West.As for Laughlin, he worked for a couple of W.N.B.A. teams and the Canton Charge of the N.B.A. G League, for whom he drove the team bus, before joining the Warriors as a video intern in 2015. After four seasons, he has developed a feel for the coaching staff and for the sort of game footage that Kerr and his assistants want to see.As Kerr said: "And then the other thing that's crucial: I'll ask for a lot of stuff that's in the archives. I'll just tell him: 'Hey, we used to run this play three years ago that I think might work tonight. I remember we ran it against Orlando on the road.' And by that night, he'll have the clip. He goes, 'Here you go.' It's incredible. It would take me months to find it."During the season, the video staff members spend countless hours breaking down film, which essentially involves identifying opposing plays in painstaking detail while cutting out the dead time during games so that each is condensed into a tidy 48-minute package. In the middle of February, the Warriors might be playing the Miami Heat, but Rubin will be crouched over his laptop cutting film of a game between the Portland Trail Blazers and the Dallas Mavericks.By labeling everything with specialized software - the actions, the players involved, the types of possessions - the video staff members create an extensive database. They also break down film of the Warriors themselves. Rubin said he picked his spots to spice things up. For example, he might let a clip go for an extra second if Draymond Green was particularly expressive after Stephen Curry buried a 3-pointer. There is no real reason for Rubin to include Green's theatrics, since the possession is over."But we just want to show that Draymond made this face," Rubin said.Several prominent N.B.A. coaches got their starts as video coordinators, including Mike Budenholzer of the Milwaukee Bucks, Frank Vogel of the Los Angeles Lakers and Erik Spoelstra of the Miami Heat - which is no coincidence. The job has been likened to graduate school for aspiring coaches."You learn everything in that room," Steve Kerr said. "You learn everything about the league. You only survive if you've got a prodigious work ethic."And with the Warriors, the responsibilities of the job extend beyond the video room. The coordinators pitch in with player development. They assist with game plans. They report to the practice facility to rebound for players who want extra shots."They basically do everything," DeMarco said.During playoff games, Laughlin sits behind the bench and helps identify opposing play calls. Rubin and Nick Kerr occupy an office near the locker room, where they edit film of the game in progress so the players and coaches can review clips as needed. Laughlin will sometimes scribble the time of a possession on a scrap of paper and have a member of the training staff deliver it to Rubin and Kerr, who will download it onto an iPad and have it sent to the bench."It's so awesome to be a part of this," Laughlin said, "because we know how fortunate we are. We know how many people would kill to be in these seats."But while they have savored the Warriors' run, they are bracing for change: Next season, the team is moving to a new arena in San Francisco that will also house its practice facility. No one is quite certain where the video room will be located. Laughlin half-jokingly referred to a "dungeon." There is concern."I hope the dynamic doesn't change," Nick Kerr said.At least they can leave the space heater behind.
2021 07 10
leer más